Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for December, 2011

Replacing or repairing masonry mortar is usually necessary in the restoration of historical constructions, but the selection of a proper mortar is often problematic. An inappropriate choice can lead to failure of the restoration work, and perhaps even further damage. Thus, a thorough understanding of the original mortar technology and the fabrication of appropriate replacement materials are important research goals.

A systematic study of sticky rice−lime mortar technology was conducted to help determine the proper courses of action in restoring ancient buildings. Lime mortars with varying sticky rice content were prepared and tested. The physical properties, mechanical strength, and compatibility of lime mortar were found to be significantly improved by the introduction of sticky rice, suggesting that sticky rice−lime mortar is a suitable material for repairing mortar in ancient masonry. Moreover, the amylopectin in the lime mortar was found to act as an inhibitor; the growth of the calcium carbonate crystals is controlled by its presence, and a compact structure results, which may explain the enhanced performance of this organic−inorganic composite compared to single-component lime mortar.

Source: ACS Publications
Related: Ancient Bricks of Sand, Glutinous Rice and Rice Hulls

Read Full Post »


Read Full Post »

Read Full Post »

Read Full Post »

Abstract
The characteristic property of naturally-occurring geopolymers is a high content of humic materials that are recognized by the nitrogen function. Through a simulated geopolymerization, biopolymers with non-nitrogen function, such as xanthan gum, were found to have the characteristics of humic acid by means of UV–Vis spectrometry. This fact ascertains that any kind of biopolymer may naturally transform to a geopolymer. A geopolymer is a type of crosslinked long-chain compound, built in three-dimensional structures whose property is immune to microbial degradation. A crosslinked biopolymer was shown to have the same characterization as a geopolymer that has a long life due to its crosslinking capacity and antimicrobial properties. In this study, the formation of petroleum-based geopolymers (e.g., kerogen) was introduced. This study may elucidate the structure of geomacromolecules and the mechanism of their formation, closely related with crosslink reaction between inorganic and organic molecules. This will further change the conventional definition of geopolymer that involves only the inorganic geopolymer.

Source: SpringLink.com

Read Full Post »

After weeks of enduring the ash brought on by Chile’s Puyehue volcano, one Argentine woman has decided to transform the grey sediment into something useful. Maria Irma Mansilla used the sediment and sand spewed by the volcano to create bricks. She hopes she and her neighbours will be able to produce them on a large scale to build homes for the poor. Eric Camara reports. (Click on link below to see video.)

Source: BBC News
[Lots of people are using fly ash for making geopolymer. Using volcanic ash is less common. That’s what the Romans used to great success.]

Read Full Post »

Abstract
Inorganic geopolymers or simply geopolymers based on silico-aluminate are relatively novel materials with a wide range of potential applications. The main purpose of the present study was to experimentally investigate the composition microstructure- property relationship of these new materials. These must be understood in order to optimise the performance of geopolymers. Geopolymers with different chemical compositions (Si:Al and Na:Al atomic ratios) were prepared by thermally assisted alkali-activation of metakaolinite at 70ºC. Metakaolinite was obtained by dehydroxylation of kaolinite at 750ºC for 6 hours. Measurements indicated that the compositions of geopolymers influence the microstructural character as well as the physical and mechanical properties of these materials. Geopolymers prepared with an atomic ratio of Si:Al = 1.04 and 1.25 are categorised as sodium-poly(sialate) (Na-PS) geopolymers. These materials were found to be composed of zeolite-A or zeolite-X in conjunction with amorphous geopolymer. These materials are relatively soft, with low density and high apparent porosity, and have low hardness and compressive strength. Geopolymers prepared with an atomic ratio of Si:Al = 1.50, 1.75 and 2.00 are categorised as sodium-poly(sialate-siloxo) (Na-PSS) geopolymers. The structure of these geopolymers is amorphous as observed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) with no evidence of zeolite formation. A broad amorphous hump in the X-ray diffraction patterns suggests that the Na-PSS geopolymers consist of disordered frameworks with short-range order. The thermal analysis of Na-PSS by means of thermogravitmetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) revealed that about 15% of the initial reaction water remains in the geopolymer framework. The DTA curves for Na-PSS show a single endothermic peak around 135ºC due to water evolution.

Source: Espace Library Curtin.edu

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »